Title

Gartmore House

Gartmore House was originally built by the Graham family on land acquired from the first Earl of Stirling in 1644, although the exact date of the first house is uncertain. Records show there was a house there in the 15th century. The present house, originally U-plan in design, is early 18th century in origin and a fine example of the work of William Adam.

 

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Gartmore House was originally built by the Graham family on land acquired from the first Earl of Stirling in 1644, although the exact date of the first house is uncertain. Records show there was a house there in the 15th century. The present house, originally U-plan in design, is early 18th century in origin and a fine example of the work of William Adam.

 

During the Second World War the estate was commandeered by the army and Gartmore House became a barracks until 1950 when the Archdiocese of Glasgow bought the house to establish St. Ninians, a List D School. This school was run by the De La Salle Brothers, a Roman Catholic religious order. At this time outbuildings were added to the original house to provide classroom accommodation. By 1982 the school was closed and the house was empty for the next three years until its purchase by The Way College of Biblical Research.

In 1981, the National Trust for Scotland transferred the Cunninghame Graham Memorial to Gartmore from its original site near the Graham family home at Ardoch, near Dumbarton. Robert Bontine Cunninghame Graham succeeded to the Gartmore estate in 1883 and was the last member of the Graham family to be laird of Gartmore. Don Roberto, as he was affectionte1y known, was an author, traveller and horseman who spent a number of years in South America. He was also a member of parliament from 1886 to 1892 and was President of the National Party of Scotland in the late 1920's.